2011-04-02

Hitting “Stryde” in your early career, part 4

Drake Editorial Team

A 5-Part Series on ‘Managing the Boss’

 

Part 4: Be Transparent About Your Ambitions (Shortcut # 46)

Excerpt from Hitting Stryde: An Early Career Survival Guide by Daneal Charney and David James Singh Want to read the other parts first?

This helps your boss look for opportunities to give you new experiences while you are doing the same. Never think it is your boss’s job to manage your career. In fact, remember that no one cares more about your career than you. Don’t wait for opportunities; go make them. Talk to your boss, or other senior people in the organization, about your career development path. Get to know their assistants and leverage them to get some face time. We guarantee that if you ask for just 20 minutes of even the busiest person’s schedule they’ll give you 30, if you frame it as a request for their guidance on your career. Set time to review your long- and short-term goals, aspirations and motivations. Once a date is set, confirm you are on the boss’s calendar. After the meeting, follow-up on any recommended actions and send the person a thank-you note. Want more career shortcuts, get them here.

 

For Part 5 of the “Managing the Boss” series, check back here in a few days!  Or, click here to subscribe so you’ll be sure not to miss it!

2013-06-18

How do you build (or rebuild) trust at work?

Drake Editorial Team

How easy would it be to sort out difficulties at work if you didn't trust your colleagues to respond well? How motivating would it be if once you raised a concern with your manager, nothing was done about it?

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2014-04-14

Success depends on your team: tap the potential

Drake Editorial Team

The lesson for leaders who evaluate people--that is, every leader--is to adopt a "glass half full" versus a "glass half empty" attitude...

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2011-04-04

Common resume blunders

Drake Editorial Team

One of the most prevalent resume blunders is to turn your resume into a dull list of job duties and responsibilities. Many people even use company job descriptions as guides to developing their resumes.

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